Faculty of Arts, Humanities and Cultures

School of Fine Art, History of Art and Cultural Studies

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David Jackson

Professor of Russian & Scandinavian Art Histories

0113 34 35196

Fine Art Building, Room 301

Office hours: By appointment

BA Wales, PhD Edinburgh

David’s primary research interests reside in the socio-political interventions of realist and naturalist art in the formation of national identities in the Russian and Nordic nations, with specific expertise in exhibition curatorship and wider public dissemination of research in the museum/gallery domain.

Biography

David’s work in the fields of Russian and Nordic art addresses questions of art’s role in affecting social or political interventions during crucial periods of nationalist aspiration of the search for distinctive cultural identity through the utilisation of the visual arts. In the past decade he has been particularly active in the field of public exhibition projects and has curated exhibition for many major institutions, including the National Gallery, the Scottish National Gallery, the Van Gogh Museum, and the Swedish National Gallery.

Research Interests

David Jackson works principally in the fields of nineteenth century Nordic, Russian and Soviet art, with teaching interests in the cultures of Classical Greece and Victorian Britain. His chief areas of research concern the formation of national and international identities, critical and national forms of realism, and with a specialism for exhibition curatorship. He has published on 19th century Russian realism with particular reference to the works of Ilya Repin and is the author of The Russian Vision: the Art of Ilya Repin (BAI, 2006; Antique Collectors’ Club 2015) and The Wanderers and critical realism in nineteenth century Russian painting (MUP, 2006; 2011).

His exhibition work includes as co-editor and contributor Russian Landscape at the Groninger Museum, Holland and the National Gallery, London (2003–2004); Akseli Gallen-Kallela (1865-1931), the Spirit of Finland (2006-2007)and Russian Myths, Legends and Fairy Tales (2007-2008) for the Groninger Museum; Christen Købke: Danish Master of Light22, at the National Gallery, London and the National Gallery of Scotland, Edinburgh (2010); The Peredvizhniki. Pioneers of Russian painting33 for Stockholm’s Nationalmuseum and Kunstsammlungen Chemnitz, Germany (2011-12); and Nordic Art: The Modern Breakthrough8, for the Groninger Museum, Netherlands, and the Kunsthalle der Hypo-Kulturstiftung, Munich (2012-13).

He has also made written contributions to the exhibition catalogues Illusions of Reality. Naturalist painting, photography, theatre and cinema 1875-191844, at the Van Gogh Museum, Amsterdam and Ateneum Art Museum, Helsinki (2010-11);  P C Skovgaard. The Danish Golden Age Re-evaluated55, Fuglsang Kunstmuseum and Skovgaard Museet, Denmark (2010-11); In Front of Nature. The European Landscapes of Thomas Fearnley  6 for the Barber Institute of Fine Arts7 (2012); Baltic Reflections. The Collection of Malmö Konstmuseum. The Era of the Baltic Exhibition, 1914, Malmö Konstmuseum, 2014; and A Beautiful Lie – Eckersberg, Statens Museum for Kunst, Hamburger Kunsthalle and the Fondation Custodia, Paris, 2015-16.

Teaching

David teaches at all levels with specialist modules on Russian and Soviet art, Danish Golden age Painting, and the visual culture of Periclean Athens. He supervises dissertations at undergraduate and postgraduate level as well as PhD supervision.

Responsibilities

David is currently the programme manager for the BA History of Art

Publications

Books

  • Jackson D; Blühm A; Schenk R (eds.) (2017) Die Romantik im Norden. Von Friedrich bis Turner. Zwolle: WBOOKS.

  • Jackson D; Blühm A; Schenk R (eds.) (2017) De Romantiek in het Noorden. Van Friedrich tot Turner.. Zwolle: WBOOKS.

  • Jackson D; Blühm A; Schenk R (eds.) (2017) Romanticism in the North – from Friedrich to Turner. Zwolle: Uitgeverij WBOOKS.

  • Jackson D (2015) The Russian Vision: The Art of Ilya Repin. 2015. Woodbridge: Antique Collectors' Club.

  • Jackson D (2012) Nordic Art. The Modern Breakthrough (1860-1921). 2012. Munich: Hirmer Verlag.

    Catalogue of exhibition at The Groninger Museum, 8 December 2012 – 5 May 2013 and Kunsthalle der Hypo-Kulturstiftung, Munich, 25 May – 6 October 2013.

  • Jackson D (2012) Nordic Art 1880-1920. Munich: Hirmer Verlag.

    Catalogue of exhibition at The Groninger Museum, 8 December 2012 – 5 May 2013 and Kunsthalle der Hypo-Kulturstiftung, Munich, 25 May – 6 October 2013

  • Jackson D (2012) Aus Dämmerung und Licht. Meisterwerke Nordischer Malerei 1860-1920. 2012. Munich: Hirmer Verlag.

    Catalogue of exhibition at The Groninger Museum, 8 December 2012 – 5 May 2013 and Kunsthalle der Hypo-Kulturstiftung, Munich, 25 May – 6 October 2013.

  • Jackson D, Hedstrom P (2012) Die Peredwischniki Maler des russischen Realismus, Kunstsammlungen-chemnitz, Chemnitz, 2012.. Chemnitz: Kunstsammlungen Chemnitz. National Museum, Stockholm.

  • Jackson D (2011) The Peredvizhniki – Pioneers of Russian Painting. Stockholm: Nationalmuseum, Stockholm.

  • Jackson D (2010) "Christen Købke: Danish Master of Light". Single authored book/catalogue to attend exhibition at National Gallery London and National Gallery of Scotland, Edinburgh. National Gallery Publications/Yale UP.

  • Wageman P, Jackson D (2006) Akseli Gallen-Kallela (1865-1931). De magie van Finland,. NAi, Holland.

    Author URL [www.naipublishers.nl]

    This catalogue/book accompanies an exhibition of the pre-eminent ‘national’ Finnish artist's work, held at the Groninger Museum, Groningen, and Holland 17 December 2006 – 15 April 2007. My involvement, which came at the Museum’s invitation, is as guest curator, co-editor of the catalogue with Patty Wageman, the Museum’s director, and as contributor of a key single-authored essay. This is the first major show of its kind outside of Scandinavia and will form a key text for any future study of the artist’s work. The exhibition draws on works from major public collections as well as rarely seen and exclusive pieces in private hands, making this the largest and hitherto most unique showing of the artist’s work. The catalogue also exists in English as Akseli Gallen-Kallela (1865-1931). The Spirit of Finland.

  • Jackson D (2006) The Russian vision: the art of Ilya Repin. BAI, Schoten.

    Ilya Repin (1844-1930) is a key figure of Russian nineteenth century Realism, the finest and most celebrated national painter of his generation. His career spanned a period of huge cultural, social and political change which witnessed the challenge to Russian autocracy, the coming of the October Revolution and the dawn of the Soviet Union. From humble peasant beginnings Repin rose to a place of artistic preeminence and international acclaim and was the most important influence in shaping a distinctly Russian school of art. Through a series of successful but controversial works he addressed such issues as the hard lives of the peasants, the fate of revolutionary activists and Russian history, as well as painting some of the nation’s greatest cultural figures, many of whom – such as Tolstoy, Musorgsky and Gorky – he counted as personal friends. A painter of immense technical and aesthetic talent, Repin’s vibrant, colourful and highly topical canvases offer a fascinating panorama of all strata of life in late-Tsarist Russia and a microcosm of the issues that preoccupied Russian thought during this crucial period of historical change. This is the first book by a western art historian devoted to a full critical analysis of Repin’s vast output. Drawing on a wealth of illustration from public and private collections in Russia and abroad, it combines close readings of all his major canvases, as well as many of his most intriguing but lesser known works, within the broader context of Russian art, society and culture. Written in an accessible style, this unique publication will be essential reading for academics, students and enthusiasts interested in Russian art, Slavic culture and nineteenth century painting.

  • Jackson D, Wageman P (2006) Akseli Gallen-Kallela: the spirit of Finland. Groningen : Groninger Museum ; Rotterdam : NA.

    Author URL [www.naipublishers.nl]

    This catalogue/book accompanies an exhibition of the pre-eminent ‘national’ Finnish artist's work, held at the Groninger Museum, Groningen, and Holland 17 December 2006 – 15 April 2007. My involvement, which came at the Museum’s invitation, is as guest curator, co-editor of the catalogue with Patty Wageman, the Museum’s director, and as contributor of a key single-authored essay. This is the first major show of its kind outside of Scandinavia and will form a key text for any future study of the artist’s work. The exhibition draws on works from major public collections as well as rarely seen and exclusive pieces in private hands, making this the largest and hitherto most unique showing of the artist’s work. The catalogue also exists in Dutch translation as Akseli Gallen-Kallela (1865-1931). De magie van Finland.

  • Jackson D (2006) The Wanderers and critical realism in nineteenth-century Russian art. Critical Perspectives in Art History. Manchester University Pres.

    The rise of critical realism in nineteenth-century Russia culminated in 1870 with the formation of the Wanderers, Russia’s first independent artistic society. Through depictions of the harsh lives of the peasantry, the fate of political activists, Russian history, landscapes, and portraits of the nation’s cultural elite, such as Tolstoy and Dostoevsky, the society became synonymous with dissident sentiments. Yet its members were far from being purveyors of anti-Tsarist propaganda and their canvases reflect also a warm humanity and a fierce pride for such nationalistic themes as Russian myth and legend. This is the first critical analysis of the Wanderers from an art historical perspective. Through close readings of single canvases, investigations of major themes and a multi-disciplinary integration of the Wanderers within Russian society, this book gives the first comprehensive analysis of the crucial cultural role played by one of the most successful and genuinely popular schools of art, the legacy of which comprises a fascinating panorama of life and thought in pre-revolutionary Russia.

  • Wageman P, Jackson D (2003) Het Russische Landschap. BAI Schoten.

    Exhibition catalogue

    Dutch version of Russian Landscape catalogue. See separate entry. This catalogue accompanies a large retrospective of nineteenth century Russian landscape painting held at the Groninger Museum, Holland, and the National Gallery, London, between December 2003 – September 2004; the first major show if its kind in the West. It charts the use of landscape painting within the development of Russian artistic activity and the social and cultural agents that informed art’s problematic deployment within tsarist political structures. In particular it considers the role of landscape within nationalist debates seeking to create a distinctly Russian school of art and its later evolution towards modernist and aesthetic preoccupations. The exhibition and catalogue further concentrate on some of the leading practitioners within the realist school of the Peredvizhniki or ‘Wanderers’, such as Ivan Shishkin, Arkhip Kuindzhi, and Isaak Levitan, to consider the many ways in which representations of the land reflected and shaped intellectual preoccupations.

  • Jackson D, Wageman P (2003) Russian landscape. BAI, Schoten.

    Exhibition catalogue

    This catalogue accompanies a large retrospective of nineteenth century Russian landscape painting held at the Groninger Museum, Holland, and the National Gallery, London, between December 2003 – September 2004; the first major show if its kind in the West. It charts the use of landscape painting within the development of Russian artistic activity and the social and cultural agents that informed art’s problematic deployment within tsarist political structures. In particular it considers the role of landscape within nationalist debates seeking to create a distinctly Russian school of art and its later evolution towards modernist and aesthetic preoccupations. The exhibition and catalogue further concentrate on some of the leading practitioners within the realist school of the Peredvizhniki or ‘Wanderers’, such as Ivan Shishkin, Arkhip Kuindzhi, and Isaak Levitan, to consider the many ways in which representations of the land reflected and shaped intellectual preoccupations.

Journal articles

  • Jackson D (2012) “Akseli Gallen-Kallela: "Un reve de vie surabondante"”, Dossier de l'Art. 192.Janvier 2012: 14-21.

  • Jackson D (2010) “‘Christen Købke, quand le silence est d’or’”, Dossier de l'Art: Paris. 173: 2-15.

  • Jackson D (2010) “'Christen Købke: Reassessing the Finest Painter of Denmark’s “Golden Age”,”, Fine Art Connoisseur New York. May/June 2010: 26-29.

  • Jackson D (2010) “Master of Light”, Art Quarterly. Spring 2010: 52-55.

  • Jackson D (2009) “Charlotte Christensen, 1900 – The Year of Art Nouveau. Paris – Copenhagen / Copenhagen – Paris”, Journal of the History of Collections. : 1-2.

  • Jackson D (2005) “‘Enigma Variations: the search for meaning in Ilya Repin’s They did not expect him’”, Historisch Tijdschrift. 168.38: 371-382.

    special edition: Russische intelligentsia

    This article provides a detailed analysis and critical reading of Repin's seminal imaging of nineteenth century Russian political activism, and seeks to place this important canvas within the contexts of contemporary social, aesthetic and political controversies surrounding its production and critical reception. In particular it seeks a clearer and more comprehensive ‘reading’ of the work and argues for a broader conceptualization of the canvas’ import. Close scrutiny is given to Repin’s subtle nuancing of then contemporary debates as a means to effect a series of strategic cultural interventions that break with convention to interrogate the corrosive polarization of political extremes in late Tsarist Russia.

  • Jackson D (2002) “Valentin Serov: Portraits of Russia's Silver Age”, RUSS REV. 61.4: 632-633.

  • Jackson D (2001) “Russian genre painting in the nineteenth century”, SLAVON E EUR REV. 79.4: 737-739.

  • Jackson D (2000) “Garshin and Repin: Writer and Artist in a Creative Relationship.”, Vsevolod Garshin at the Turn of the Century: An international Miscellany in Three Volumes Henry P; Porudominskii V; Girshman M (eds.). 2: 102-111.

    Account of the productive relationship between Russian writer Vsevolod Garshin and painter Ilya Repin.

  • Jackson D (2000) “Seeing Red: Soviet Art through Western eyes.”, Edinburgh Essays. Russia on the Edge of the Millennium. Reid E (eds.). : 213-235.

    Western readings of Soviet art.

  • Jackson D (1998) “Western Aesthetics and Russian Ethics: Repin in Paris 1873 - 76”, The Russian Review. 57: 394-409.

  • Jackson D (1997) “A Newly Discovered Portrait of Tsar Nicholas II by Ilya Repin”, Apollo. CXLVI: 32-37.

    New reserach into a recently rediscovered portrait by the Russian realist Ilya Repin.

Chapters

  • Jackson D (2017) “Het romantische landschap in de Scandinavische schilderkunst. Een dubbele helix”, In: Jackson D; Blühm A; Schenk R (eds.) De Romantiek in het Noorden. Van Friedrich tot Turner. Zwolle: WBOOKS. 23-23

  • Jackson D (2017) “Nordische romantische Landschaft: eine Doppelhelix”, In: Jackson D; Blühm A; Schenk R (eds.) Die Romantik im Norden. Von Friedrich bis Turner. Zwolle: WBOOKS. 23-23

  • Jackson D (2017) “Nordic Romantic Landscape: a Double Helix”, In: Jackson D; Blühm A; Schenk R (eds.) Romanticism in the North – from Friedrich to Turner. Zwolle: WBOOKS. 23-39

  • Jackson D (2015) “Eckersberg set udefra Arternes Oprindelse”, In: Monrad K (eds.) En smuk løgn – Eckersberg. 2015. Copenhagen: Statens Museum for Kunst. 173-194

  • Jackson D (2015) “Origin of species. Eckersberg from the outside”, In: Monrad K (eds.) A Beautiful Lie – Eckersberg. 2015. Copenhagen: Statens Museum for Kunst. 173-194

  • Jackson D (2014) “A Chaos of Colour and Form – Ett kaos av färg och form”, In: Widenheim C (eds.) Baltiska speglingar: Malmö Konstmuseums samling.Tiden kring Baltiska utställingen 1914. Baltic Reflections. The Collection of Malmö Konstmuseum. The Era of the Baltic Exhibition, 1914. Lund, Sweden: Malmö Konstmuseum, Bokförlaget Arena. 124-153

    This article puts the Russian artists whose work was shown at the 1914 Baltic Exhibition in Malmö, Sweden in a broader cultural and historical context in terms of what kind of relationship artists of the Russian cultural scene had to the Nordic countries and to the art scene in Paris at the turn of the century. It considers also what role the naturalistic and realistic tendencies played in the creation of nation states. In particular it focusses on how the charismatic Russian impresario Sergei Diaghilev, the founder of the journal Mir iskusstva (World of Art) and the Ballets Russes, was a central figure around who the exhibition artists had trained or worked with.

  • Jackson D (2014) “On the Nature of Progress”, In: Thams M; Heilmann H (eds.) Making room. 2014. Copenhagen: Den Frie Centre of Contemporary Art. 37-43

  • Jackson D (2012) “P.C. Skovgaard. The view from abroad”, In: Oelsner G; Lyyke Grand K (eds.) P.C.Skovgaard The Danish Golden Age Reassessed. Acta Jutlandica Humanistisk Serie 2010/8. On-line publication: Fuglsand Kunstmuseum and the Skovgaard Museum. 1-13

  • Jackson D (2012) “Der lange Weg: Ilja Repins Wolgatreidler”, In: Jackson D; Hedström P (eds.) Die Peredwischniki Maler des russischen Realismus. Chemnitz: Kunstsammlungen-chemnitz, Chemnitz. 56-71

  • Jackson D (2012) “Nordic Art. The Modern Breakthrough”, In: Jackson D (eds.) Aus Dämmerung und Licht : Meisterwerke nordischer Malerei 1860 - 1920 ; [anlässlich der Ausstellungen "Aus Dämmerung und Licht. Meisterwerke Nordischer Malerei 1860 - 1920", Kunsthalle der Hypo-Kultur. 2012. Munich: Hirmer Verlag. 11-25

    Der Ausstellungskatalog belegt den Facettenreichtum nordischer Malerei des sogenannten äModernen Durchbruchsä in der 2. Hälfte des 19. Jahrhunderts.

  • Jackson D (2012) “Nordische Kunst. Durchbruch der Moderne”, In: Jackson D (eds.) Aus Dämmerung und Licht. Meisterwerke Nordischer Malerei 1860-1920. 2012. Munich: Hirmer Verlag. 11-25

  • Jackson D (2012) “Aufruhr und Tradition: die Kunst der Peredwischniki”, In: Jackson D; Hedström P (eds.) Die Peredwischniki Maler des russischen Realismus. Chemnitz: Kunstsammlungen-chemnitz, Chemnitz. 16-36

  • Jackson D (2012) “Noord-Europese Kunst. De Moderne Doorbraak”, In: Jackson D (eds.) Nordic Art 1880-1920. 2012. Munich: Hirmer Verlag. 11-25

  • Jackson D (2012) “Fearnley, Italy and the oil sketch tradition”, In: Sumner A; Smith G (eds.) In Front of Nature The European Landscapes of Thomas Fearnley. Barber Institute of Fine Arts, Birmingham. London: D. Giles Ltd. 35-57

  • Jackson D (2012) “P.C. Skovgaard. The View from Abroad”, In: OELSNER G; LYKKE GRAND K (eds.) P.C.Skovgaard The Danish Golden Age Reassessed. On line edition. Denmark: Skovgaard Museet and Fuglsang Kunstmuseum.

  • Jackson D (2011) “The Longest haul: Ilya Repin’s Barge-haulers on the Volga”, In: Jackson D; Hedström P (eds.) The Peredvizhniki – Pioneers of Russian Painting. Stockholm: Nationalmuseum, Stockholm. 56-71

  • Jackson D (2011) “Sedition and tradition: the art of the Peredvizhniki”, In: Jackson D; Hedström P (eds.) The Peredvizhniki – Pioneers of Russian Painting. Stockholm: Nationalmuseum, Stockholm. 16-37

  • Jackson D (2010) “Pohjoista naturalismia: Venäjä ja Pohjoismaat”, In: Arjen Sankarit. Naturalismi kuvataiteessa, valokuvassa ja elokuvassa, 1875-1918. 100-127

  • Jackson D (2010) “Naturalism i norr: De nordiska länderna och Ryssland”, In: Vardagens Hjaltär. Naturalismen i bildkonsten, fotografiet och filmen 1875-1918. 100-127

  • Jackson D (2010) "Natural North; Russia and the Nordic Countries" in Illusions of Reality: Naturalist Painting, Photography, Theatre and Cinema 1875-1918. Exhibition Catalogue. Van Gogh Museum, Ateneum Art Museum, MercatorFonds.

  • Jackson D (2010) “Le Nord et sa nature: la Russie et les pays scandinaves”, In: Weisberg G (eds.) L’illusion de la Réalité. Peinture, photographie, Théâtre et cinema naturalists, 1875-1918. 100-127

  • Jackson D (2010) “Der natürliche Norden – Russland und die nordischen Länder”, In: Weisberg G (eds.) Illusions of Reality. Naturalismus 1875-1918. 100-127

  • Jackson D (2010) “Naturalisme in het Noorden: Rusland en Sandinavie”, In: Weisberg G (eds.) Illusie en Werkelijkheid. Naturalistische schilderijen, foto’s, theater en film, 1875-1918.

  • Jackson D (2010) “P.C. Skovgaard - Set fra udlandet”, In: Oelsner G; Lykke Grand K (eds.) P.C. Skovgaard. Dansk Guldalder revurderet. Denmark: Århus Universitetsforlag. 219-232

  • Jackson D (2007) “‘Buiten zinnen. De fantasiewerelden van Viktor Vasnetsov en Ivan Bilibin’”, In: Wageman P (eds.) Russische sprookjes, volksverhalen en legenden. Nai Publishers, Rotterdam. 30-41

    Dutch version of ‘Out of Their Minds. The Fantasy Worlds of Viktor Vasnetsov and Ivan Bilibin'. A critical investigation of the exploitation and diverse uses/interpretations of folk- and fairy-tale imagery in the work of these two key practitioners of late 19th century Russian art. In more general terms an analysis of the use and approporation of indigenous art forms in Russian art of this period.

  • Jackson D (2007) “‘Out of Their Minds. The Fantasy Worlds of Viktor Vasnetsov and Ivan Bilibin’”, In: Wageman P (eds.) Russian Fairytales, Folk Tales and Legends. Nai Publishers, Rotterdam. 30-41

    A critical investigation of the exploitation and diverse uses/interpretations of folk- and fairy-tale imagery in the work of these two key practitioners of late 19th century Russian art. In more general terms an analysis of the use and approporation of indigenous art forms in Russian art of this period.

  • Jackson D (2006) “Het onbedorven wezen van het Finse volkverbeeld”, In: Wageman P; Jackson D (eds.) Akseli Gallen-Kallela (1865-1931). De magie van Finland. NAi, Holland. 22-31

    Author URL [www.naipublishers.nl]

    This article is the first assessment and analysis in English of the artist's early so-called 'wilderness' paintings which imaged the ordinary people of the emerging nation as it struggled for independence from Russian domination. It addresses specifically the extent to which these works have been accorded a cultural significance as being both a digest and taxonomy of the Finnish people, as well as giving form to a concept of nationhood which still pertains. The article also exists in English as 'Wild at Heart. Imaging the Finnish People, within the catalogue Akseli Gallen-Kallela (1865-1931). The Spirit of Finland, pp. 22-31.

  • Jackson D (2006) “Wild at Heart. Imaging the Finnish People”, In: Jackson D; Wageman P (eds.) Akseli Gallen-Kallela (1865-1931). The Spirit of Finland. NAi, Holland. 22-31

    Author URL [www.naipublishers.nl]

    This article is the first assessment and analysis in English of the artist's early so-called 'wilderness' paintings which imaged the ordinary people of the emerging nation as it struggled for independence from Russian domination. It addresses specifically the extent to which these works have been accorded a cultural significance as being both a digest and taxonomy of the Finnish people, as well as giving form to a concept of nationhood which still pertains. The article also exists in Dutch translation as ‘Het onbedorven wezen van het Finse volkverbeeld’, within the catalogue Akseli Gallen-Kallela (1865-1931). De magie van Finland, pp. 22-31.

  • Jackson D (2003) “The Motherland. Tradition and Innovation in Russian Landscape Painting”, In: Jackson D; Wageman P (eds.) Russian Landscape. BAI Schoten. 52-78

    Exhibition catalogue

    This is the largest and lead article within the catalogue Russian Landscape (see separate entries for English and Dutch versions). It gives a broad consideration of the development of landscape painting in nineteenth century Russia and its conceptualization of the Russian ‘Motherland’ in art, before evolving a more detailed analysis of the social, critical and aesthetic debates engendered by the interventions of landscape painting within the ostensibly critical-realist society of artists known as the Wanderers. Particular attention is given to the role of landscape painting in subverting the Society’s originally critical ethos to more nationalist and pro-aesthetic agendas which both questioned prevailing utilitarian constructs of art, and provided a springboard towards avant-garde activity.

  • Jackson D (2003) “Moeder Rusland: Traditie en Vernieuwing in de Russische Landschapsschilderkunst”, In: Wageman P; Jackson D (eds.) Russian Landscape. BAI Schoten. 52-79

    Exhibition catalogue

    Dutch version of The Motherland. Tradition and Innovation in Russian Landscape Painting. See separate entry. This is the largest and lead article within the catalogue Russian Landscape (see separate entries for English and Dutch versions). It gives a broad consideration of the development of landscape painting in nineteenth century Russia and its conceptualization of the Russian ‘Motherland’ in art, before evolving a more detailed analysis of the social, critical and aesthetic debates engendered by the interventions of landscape painting within the ostensibly critical-realist society of artists known as the Wanderers. Particular attention is given to the role of landscape painting in subverting the Society’s originally critical ethos to more nationalist and pro-aesthetic agendas which both questioned prevailing utilitarian constructs of art, and provided a springboard towards avant-garde activity.

  • Jackson D (2000) “Alternative Centres: The Soviet Union”, In: Kemp M (eds.) The Oxford History of Western Art. Oxford University Press. pp.00+

Conference papers

  • Jackson D (2013) Nordic Art. The Modern Breakthrough. Nordic Cosmopolitans (Accepted)

  • Jackson D (2012) Fearnley and Italy. Thomas Fearnley and His Contemporaries

  • Jackson D (2012) Stranger in a Strange Land. The Challenges of Intercultural Communication. After the Party. New research on Munch and his Nordic Contemporaries (Accepted)

  • Jackson D (2012) Careers in Academia and Research-led Curating. AAH Postgraduate Careers Day (Submitted)

    Conference organised by the Association of Art Historians and the Museums and Exhibitions Group of the AAH

  • Jackson D (2010) Invited: Panel member. The Order of Turmoil – Images of the Golden Age as Cultural Heritage

  • Jackson D (2010) Christen Købke. Danish Master of Light. Scholars’ Colloquium

  • Jackson D (2010) Conference paper: ‘Adventures in the Exhibition Trade’. Don’t Ask for the Mona Lisa

  • Jackson D (2010) Kobke and the Golden Age. Kobke and the Golden Age

Reports

  • Jackson D (2016) At the National Portrait Gallery. London: London Review of Books.

    Review of Russia and the Arts: The Age of Tolstoy and Tchaikovsky at The National Portrait Gallery

  • Jackson D (2011) Ilya Repin, A Parisian Cafe. London:

    Also published as a separate supplementary publication in English and Russian: Ilya Repin's A Parisian Cafe, Christie's, London, 2011 pp 4-16

Exhibitions

  • Jackson D Christen Købke: Danish Master of Light.

  • Jackson D Nordic Art. The Modern Breakthrough.

  • Jackson D Thomas Fearnley and Britain.

  • Jackson D, Hedström P The Peredvizhniki. Pioneers of Russian painting.

    This exhibition also had a 2nd venue: Kunstsammlungen Chemnitz: 26 February - 28 May 2012

  • Jackson D P.C. Skovgaard. The Danish Golden Age Reassessed.

  • Jackson D Illusions of Reality. Naturalist painting, photography, theatre and cinema, 1875-1918.

  • Jackson D, Wageman P Russian Legends Folk Tales and Fairy Tales.

  • Jackson D, Wageman P Akseli Gallen-Kallela (1865-1931). The Spirit of Finland.

  • Jackson D, Wageman P Russian Landscape.

Others

  • Jackson D (2013) Edvard Munch. Munch 150 from the Munch Museum and National Museum, Oslo. Brighton: Seventh Art Productions.

    Author URL [www.philgrabskyfilms.com]

    Satellite simulcast to over 1000 cinemas internationally 27 June 2013.

  • Jackson D (2013) “The Scream and Edvard Munch. In Our Time: BBC Radio 4 show with Melvyn Bragg”, BBC Radio 4. In Our Time. London: BBC.

    Radio broadcast

  • Jackson D (2004) The Volga Boatmen: The wandering of an icon. Netherlands: Radio Netherlands.

    Documentary for Radio Netherlands. Duration 30 mins.

  • Jackson D (2001) The Oxford Companion to Western Art. Oxford University Press.

    Major contributor in respect to Russian and Soviet art entries

  • Jackson D Nationalmuseum Stockholm Podcast.

    Author URL [vimeo.com]

  • Jackson D Munch's The Scream... and the appeal of anguished art. BBC News:

  • Jackson D Akseli Gallen-Kallela de Schilder van de Finse Ziel (Akseli Gallen-Kallela the painter of the Finnish Soul). AVRO Close Up. Netherlands: Channel Nederland 2.

    Documentary aired twice 6 and 12 January 2007, repeated 11 August 2009, as part of the documentary series AVRO Close Up, for channel Nederland 2.

Research Projects & Grants

Current:

Past:

C.W. Eckersberg. A Beautiful Lie. Exhibition project with Statens Museum for Kunst, Copenhagen, Hamburger Kunsthalle and the Fondation Custodia, Paris, 2015-16.

Russian Art and the Baltic Exhibition 1914. Exhibition project with the Malmö Art Gallery, Malmö, Sweden.

Nordic Art. The Modern Breakthrough. A three-year AHRC award 2010-2013 culminating in major exhibitions in The Netherlands and Germany.

In Front of Nature The European Landscapes of Thomas Fearnley, Barber Institute of Fine Arts, Birmingham, 2012–2013,

The Peredvizhniki – Pioneers of Russian Painting, Nationalmuseum, Stockholm Nationalmuseum and Kunstsammlungen-chemnitz Chemnitz , 2011-2012.

P.C. Skovgaard. The Danish Golden Age Reasssessed, Fuglsang Kunstmuseum, Fuglsang and  Skovgaard Museet, Viborg, 2011.

Illusions of Reality. Naturalist painting, photography, theatre and cinema, 1875-1918, Van Gogh Museum, Amsterdam and Ateneum Art Museum, Finnish National Gallery, Helsinki, 2010-2011.

Christen Købke 1810-1848 – 2 year AHRC research project culminating in the exhibition and book Christen Købke Danish Master of Light, National Gallery, London and Scottish National Gallery, Edinburgh, 2010.

Russian Legends Folk Tales and Fairy Tales, Groninger Museum, Holland, 2007–2008.

Akseli Gallen-Kallela (1865-1931). The Spirit of Finland, Groninger Museum, Holland, 2006–2007.

Russian Landscape, Groninger Museum, Holland and the National Gallery, London, 200 –2004.

External Appointments

Advisory Board Member of Nineteenth-Century Art Worldwide (www.19thc-artworldwide.org), digital journal of nineteenth-century art history

Editor. Romantik. Journal for the Study of Romanticisms, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark

Member Dansk Kunsthistoriker Forening – Danish Association of Art Historians

Peer reviewer for The Danish Council for Independent Research and Humanities

The White Rose Peer Review College, Committee Member

PhD & Postdoctoral Supervision

Current:

Jan Cox. PhD thesis Scandinavian Art 1880-1920: Cosmopolitan Nationalities

Pamela Crawford. Italian Futurism in relation to the first performances of Le  Sacre du Printemps Italian Futurism in relation to the first performances of Le  Sacre du Printemps.

Johanna Empson. Eco and Ego: Swedish Photography after Romantic Nationalism and the Modern Breakthrough

Caroline McCaffrey. ‘Sevres mania’: the history of collecting and display of French Sevres porcelain in Britain between 1802-1882

Xue Li. Visiting Chinese scholar. The Russian Intelligentsia.

 

PhD Thesis

Ilya Repin: Ideology and Aesthetics in Russian Art. University of Edinburgh 1990.

Ilya Repin (1844-1930) was the leading member of the Russian realist school, the Peredvizhniki, widely regarded as the finest, and undoubtedly the most celebrated, painter of his generation. His artistic legacy has, however, long suffered both from a partisan brand of Soviet art history, which seeks to confirm his standing as a precursor of the propagandist school of Socialist Realism, and a Western disregard of the Peredvizhniki, based on misconceptions regarding their motives.

In the East a continual stress on the socio-political nature of subject matter: content, ideology, meaning, has occasioned a lack of regard for aesthetic considerations, superfluous to the utilitarianism of Soviet art, whilst acceptance of this view in the West, during a century preoccupied with the non-narrative aspects of visual creation, has seen Repin stigmatised as an artistic ideologue, indifferent to formal considerations, and therefore of small importance to the history of 19th century art. Repin’s inconsistent, often contradictory views on the aims and nature of art, have assisted the efforts of hagiographers and detractors alike, but these twin biases, which have long shadowed Russian art, have in Repin’s case badly served a long and complex career by dint of crude or fallacious labelling. This thesis aims to seek a more judicious appreciation of Repin’s worth through a comprehensive survey of his life and work, utilising as reference points the twin constituents of painting, form and content, which find reflection in the East/West proclivity towards ideology and aesthetics.

The first chapter deals with Repin’s early development, from his  birth in 1844 into a provincial military settlement, to his enrolment in 1864 at the ImperialAcademy in St. Petersburg, and considers the relative influences of the Academy, the secessionist Artel based around Ivan Kramskoy, and the emerging Peredvizhniki. Chapter 2 covers Repin’s residency in Paris, 1873-1876, a period of conflicting interests during which his allegiance to the nascent Russian school of critical realism was called into question by contact with Western art.

The central chapters, 3-6, consider the chief genres within Repin’s output: history painting, scenes from contemporary life, political themes, and portraiture, and consider to what degree ideological and formal considerations shaped his mature work.

Chapter 7 deals with reactions to artistic innovations from the 1890s onwards, a period of avowed aestheticism on Repin’s part, which saw his resignation from the Peredvizhniki, transference to the reformed Academy, and a brief liaison with Diaghilev’s Mir iskusstva, but which ended in acrimonious public disputes with the forces of ‘modernism’.

Chapter 8 is devoted to the last decades of Repin’s life, spent on his estate on the Finnish Gulf, a period of physical decline and post-Revolutionary isolation, during which he worked obsessively on recurrent themes with a discernibly freer style.

The concluding chapter considers some of the East/West uses, abuses, and misunderstandings which have dogged Repin’s work, before assessing the strengths and weaknesses, consistencies and contradictions within his oeuvre, based on the findings of previous chapters.

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